The ability to smell is critical for salmon. They depend on scent to avoid predators, sniff out prey and find their way home at the end of their lives when they return to the streams where they hatched to spawn and die.

New research from NOAA Fisheries’ Northwest Fisheries Science Center and the University of Washington (UW) shows this powerful sense of smell might be in trouble as carbon emissions continue to be absorbed by our ocean. Ocean acidification is changing the water’s chemistry and lowering its pH. Specifically, higher levels of carbon dioxide, or CO2, in the water can affect the ways in which coho salmon process and respond to smells. “Salmon famously use their nose for so many important aspects of their life, from navigation and finding food to detecting predators and reproducing. So it was important for us to know if salmon would be impacted by future carbon dioxide conditions in the marine environment,” said lead author Chase Williams, a postdoctoral researcher at the UW Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences.

Salmon may lose the ability to smell danger as carbon emissions rise

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: